THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA GRADUATE CATALOG
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6.5 DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY (CH)

Chairperson: Professor Kevin Shaughnessy, Office: 2072 Shelby Hall

Graduate Director: Professor Stephen Woski, Office: 3036 Shelby Hall

 

The Department of Chemistry offers programs in the five traditional areas of chemistry (analytical, biochemistry, inorganic, organic, and physical) leading to the master of science in chemistry (Plan I or Plan II,) as outlined in the Academic Policies section of this catalog) and the doctor of philosophy in chemistry. The completion of a master's degree is optional for students enrolled in the PhD program.

 

 

Admission Requirements

In addition to meeting the general requirements of the Graduate School, entering graduate students should have completed, with an average grade of "B" or better, undergraduate coursework equivalent to a major in chemistry. Applicants may qualify for regular or conditional admission. To be considered for regular admission, an applicant must have a verbal and quantitative score of at least 1000 on the general test of the Graduate Record Examination or a score at the 50th percentile on the Miller Analogies Test.

 

An applicant whose credentials do not meet the requirements for regular admission may be considered for conditional admission if the applicant has a grade point average of 2.5 overall and an acceptable score on the appropriate admission examination. An applicant may be considered for conditional admission if he or she meets either the 3.0 GPA requirement for regular admission or the entrance examination requirement for regular admission. A student admitted conditionally must remove any undergraduate deficiencies during the first year of graduate study and must remove the condition by earning an average of "B" or better in the first 12 hours of graduate-level work.

 

Diagnostic examinations covering the traditional areas of chemistry are required of all entering graduate students. These examinations are given a few days prior to registration for the first semester so that the results may be used by the departmental graduate committee in planning the student's coursework for the first year.

See the Admission Criteria section of this catalog for more information.

 

Degree Requirements

The requirements for the MS in chemistry are the same as the Graduate School's general requirements. The PhD degree requirements also follow the policies in the Graduate Catalog.  The comprehensive examination usually consists of a number of written cumulative examinations plus the oral defense of an original research proposal. In addition, acceptable literature and research seminars must be presented to the chemistry faculty and graduate students. The PhD student's research performance is evaluated by his or her research advisor with concurrence of the student's dissertation committee. Normally, the student is expected to be an author or coauthor of at least one publication in a refereed scientific journal prior to the awarding of the degree.

 

The PhD Plan of Study is available at the Graduate School website.  All doctoral students must have a completed Plan of Study approved by the Graduate School no later than the semester during which the student will complete 30 semester hours of UA and/or transfer credit for the doctoral degree.  Otherwise, a “hold” may be placed on future registrations.
 

A department-approved Admission to Candidacy for the Doctoral Degree is submitted to the Graduate School as soon as possible after passing the comprehensive (preliminary) examination.  See the online Graduate Catalog Degree Requirements section for details on Plan of Study, Admission to Candidacy, and all other degree requirements.

 

 

Financial Assistance

Financial assistance for graduate students in chemistry is available through fellowships, graduate teaching assistantships, and graduate research assistantships.

 

 

Course Descriptions: Analytical Chemistry

CH 521 Introduction to Graduate Analytical Chemistry. Three hours.
Generally, this course is for entering students whose undergraduate training in analytical chemistry is insufficient.

CH 524 Spectroscopic Methods of Analysis. Three hours.
Provides graduate students with knowledge of the fundamental aspects of various modern methods of spectroscopic analysis. Reference to analytical applications and experimental methods is made, where relevant.

CH 525 Chromatography. Three hours.
Incorporates both a theoretical and a practical component. The separations theory will be developed and applied to gas chromatography and high pressure liquid chromatography/planar chromatography. Hyphenated techniques are emphasized. Students must master a GC/MS tutorial and carry out a project on analysis of an unknown.

CH 526 Chemometrics. Three hours.
Chemometrics involves the application of statistical and mathematical methods to chemistry. Areas of emphasis will be data and error analysis, calibration, experimental design, signal processing and transform procedures, and data description and enhancement.

CH 621/ CH 622 Current Trends in Analytical Chemistry. Three hours.

CH 625 Electrochemistry. Three hours

Introduces the fundamentals of electrochemistry and their applications to chemical problems. Special emphasis will be given to the study of electrochemical methods, electrode reaction mechanisms and the interpretation of electrochemical results for organic and inorganic systems.

 

CH 626 Surface Analytical Techniques. Three hours.
Introduces the student to the instrumentation and techniques used to study surfaces and interfaces. Spectroscopic, microscopic, desorption, and vacuum techniques are covered.

CH 627 Mass Spectrometry. Three hours.
Deals with all areas of mass spectrometry (MS), including single and multiple stage MS and chromatography/MS. The emphasis is on fundamental principles and instrumentation, as well as applications and data interpretation.

Course Descriptions: Biochemistry

CH 561 Biochemistry I. Three hours.
First-semester course in basic biochemistry. Structure and properties of biological molecules, including proteins, DNA, RNA, carbohydrates, lipids, and enzyme cofactors and prosthetic groups. Introduction to intermediary metabolism and glycolysis. Offered fall semester.

CH 562 Biochemistry II. Three hours.
Continuation of basic one-year course in biochemistry. Intermediary metabolism, TCA cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, and catabolism of biomolecules. Biosynthesis of amino acids, nucleotides, carbohydrates, and lipids. DNA and RNA replication, with introduction to recombinant technology. Protein biosynthesis and membrane transport. Offered spring semester.

CH 563 Biochemistry Laboratory. Three hours.
One lecture and one six-hour laboratory. Biochemical techniques within the structure of a semester-long research project. Topics include protein purification and chromatography, spectroscopy, electrophoresis, kinetics, and DNA manipulation.

CH 564 Biophysical Chemistry. Three hours.
The study of physical techniques applied to the development and experimental verification of biochemical hypotheses. Examples include forms of spectroscopy, treatment of multiple equilibria, and enzyme kinetics. Examples of applications are drawn from such areas as oxygen transport, oxidative phosphorylation, and photosynthesis.

CH 565 Bio-Inorganic Chemistry. Three hours.
Study of current knowledge on the roles of metal ions in biological systems, including structural and catalytic functions. Topics include bio-coordination chemistry, spectroscopic and magnetic methods, and kinetics.

CH 566 Bio-Organic Chemistry. Three hours.
Application of organic chemical concepts to biochemical systems. Topics include enzyme mechanisms at the molecular level, the chemistry of biomolecules including nucleic acids, peptides, and saccharides, and the development of chemical methods for the manipulation of biochemical systems.


Course Descriptions: Inorganic Chemistry

CH 501 Introduction to Graduate Inorganic Chemistry. Three hours. Three lectures.
Generally, this course is for entering graduate students whose undergraduate training in inorganic chemistry is insufficient.

 

CH 565 Bio-Inorganic Chemistry. Three hours. Study of current knowledge on the roles of metal ions in biological systems, including structural and catalytic functions. Topics include bio-coordination chemistry, spectroscopic and magnetic methods, and kinetics.

CH 601 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry I: Structural Methods in Inorganic Chemistry.  Three hours.

CH 602 Chemistry of Coordination Compounds. Three hours. Three lectures.


CH 604 Chemistry of the Main Group Elements. Three hours. Three lectures.


CH 605 Special Topics in Inorganic Chemistry. Three hours. Three lectures.


CH 606 X-Ray Crystallography. Three hours. Three lectures.

CH 609 Organometallic Chemistry. Three hours.

CH 611 Inclusion and Molecular Recognition. Three hours. Three lectures.


Course Descriptions: Organic Chemistry

CH 530 Introduction to Graduate Organic Chemistry. Three hours. Three lectures.
Generally, this course is for entering graduate students whose undergraduate training in organic chemistry is insufficient.

CH 531 Advanced Organic Chemistry I: Physical Organic. Three hours.
Theory and mechanism of organic transformations, detailed evaluation of organic structure, molecular dynamics, molecular orbital interactions, molecular symmetry, sterochemistry of reactions, and energetics of reaction paths.

CH 532 Advanced Organic Chemistry II: Advanced Synthesis. Three hours.
Fundamentals of organic transformations and advanced synthetic methodology with application to the synthesis of complex organic structures.

CH 566 Bio-Organic Chemistry. Three hours.
Application of organic chemical concepts to biochemical systems; enzymatic mechanisms; chemistry and biochemistry of nucleic acids, peptides, and saccharides.
 
CH 609 Organometallic Chemistry. Three hours.
Structure, bonding, and reactivity of organotransition metallic compounds, mechanisms of transformations and fundamental reaction types, applications to catalysis and organic synthesis.

CH 635 Selected Topics in Organic Chemistry. Three hours.

CH 637 Spectroscopic Techniques in Organic Chemistry. Three hours.
Fundamentals of spectroscopic techniques for structure determination of organic molecules. Theory and application of IR, NMR, and MS in organic chemistry.
 


Course Descriptions: Physical Chemistry

CH 540 Introduction to Graduate Physical Chemistry. Three hours. Three lectures.
Generally, this course is for entering graduate students whose undergraduate training in physical chemistry is insufficient.

CH 541 Advanced Physical Chemistry I: Kinetics and Statistical Thermodynamics. Three hours. Three lectures.
Prerequisite: CH 540 or equivalent.

CH 549 Advanced Physical Chemistry II: Atomic and Molecular Structure. Three hours.

CH 643 Quantum Mechanics. Three hours.

CH 645 Selected Topics in Physical Chemistry. Three hours.



Course Descriptions: Miscellaneous

 

CH 570 Research Techniques Chemistry. One to six hours.

CH 585/CH 586 Chemistry Seminars. Two hours.


CH 599 Thesis Research. Credit to be arranged.

 

CH 660 Advanced Research Techniques. One to six hours.

 

CH 680 Initial Research Review. One hour.

 

CH 681 Original Research Proposal. One hour.


CH 699 Dissertation Research. Credit to be arranged. Three-hour minimum.
 


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