THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA GRADUATE CATALOG
Table of Contents > College of Arts & Sciences

6.16 SCHOOL OF MUSIC (MUS)

Director: Professor Charles G. Snead, Office: 175 Moody Music Building

 

The School of Music is an accredited member of the National Association of Schools of Music, and all of its programs and policies are in accordance with NASM requirements. The School offers the doctor of musical arts degree (DMA) with concentrations in composition, performance, choral conducting, and wind conducting. Secondary concentrations may be earned in conjunction with any of the DMA concentrations. Descriptions of these curricula may be found in the Graduate Handbook of the School of Music. The master of music (MM) degree is offered with concentrations in performance, composition, musicology, theory, choral conducting, wind conducting, and church music. Program outlines are available from the School upon request.

 

The College of Education offers the MA, the Ed.S., the Ed.D., and the Ph.D. in Secondary Education (Music Education emphasis). Information concerning these degrees will be found in this catalog in the College of Education section.

 

 

 

Requirements for Admission

All courses of graduate music study must meet the general requirements of the Graduate School as given in the Admission Criteria section of this catalog. In addition, the School of Music imposes the following special requirements:

 

For the MM Degree

The bachelor of music degree in the chosen field of study from The University of Alabama or the equivalent from another accredited institution.

 

In special cases, a student holding the bachelor's degree but without a formal major in the chosen field may be admitted by examination.

 

All students must take examinations in music history and music theory prior to initial registration. Any required courses or other work specified as a result of deficiencies revealed in these examinations must be completed by the end of the first Fall semester after matriculation. A schedule of remediation will be determined by appropriate faculty and the director of graduate studies in music and may include enrollment in MUS 595 Graduate Theory Review and/or MUS 591 Graduate History Review.  Students may not earn graduate credit in theory and history until all deficiencies in the respective areas have been removed.

 

Any deficiencies revealed by analysis of undergraduate transcripts prior to enrollment must be removed within one year of initial enrollment.

 

Information about the entrance examinations may be obtained from the director of graduate studies in music.

 

 

Individual Area Requirements:

 

For the MM Degree

Performance. An audition on the major instrument. A complete repertoire list must be submitted, noting those works prepared for the audition. 

 

Voice. The demonstration of a satisfactory vocal technique in the classical style, and satisfactory singing diction and comprehension in French, German, Italian and English.

 

Composition. Submission of a group of original works, including at least one in large form.

 

Theory. Submission of examples of work that illustrate analytical and writing skills. Students must have a reading knowledge of a foreign language (usually German, French, or Italian). Those who do not have this skill at matriculation will be required to remove the deficiency, through the completion of appropriate language courses or by examination, before they are admitted to candidacy.

 

Musicology. Submission of work that illustrates research and writing skills. Students must have a reading knowledge of a foreign language (usually German, French, or Italian). Those who do not have this skill at matriculation will be required to remove the deficiency, through the completion of appropriate language courses or by examination, before they are admitted to candidacy.

 

Conducting. An audition with a University ensemble. Two major works, in contrasting styles, must be conducted. Ear training and sight-singing proficiency must be demonstrated.

   

For the DMA Degree

The student's Plan of Study for the DMA degree must be approved by the School of Music and the Graduate School by the time the student completes 30 graduate semester hours of UA and/or transfer course work. 

The master of music degree is required from The University of Alabama or the equivalent from another accredited institution. The MM equivalent must include recitals and/or major creative work, as appropriate.  

In the performance areas, an audition at the MM level that includes at least 15-20 minutes of performance time is required. It must include representative works drawn from a variety of historical periods. In composition, scores and recordings of original works, together with evidence of public performances, must be submitted.

Diagnostic entrance examinations are required in music history/literature, music theory, and writing skills.  Any required course or other work specified as a result of deficiencies revealed in these examinations must be removed by the end of the first Fall semester after matriculation.  A schedule of remediation will be determined by appropriate faculty and the director of graduate studies in music and may include enrollment in MUS 595 Graduate Theory Review, MUS 591 Graduate History Review, or MUS 510 Introduction to Graduate Studies in Music.  Students may not earn graduate credit in theory or history until all deficiencies in the respective areas have been removed.

Additional information is in the Degree Requirements section of this catalog.

 

 

Degree Requirements:

 

For the MM Degree

These differ with the area of specialization; a complete outline of requirements in each field is contained in the Graduate Handbook of the School of Music, which may be secured from the director of graduate studies in music or may be viewed on the School of Music Web page.

 

Concentrations in musicology, theory, and composition follow Plan I, require a written thesis. A composition student is required to present a recital of original compositions in addition to the thesis. Concentrations in performance, choral conducting, wind conducting, and church music, follow Plan II, which does not require a written thesis but which does require additional course hours and a recital. Concentrations in musicology and theory require a public lecture.

 

All MM degrees require at least 12 hours in graduate courses in music history and music theory, with at least 6 hours in each. MUS 501 Introduction to Graduate Study in Music must be taken in the first fall semester of enrollment.

 

MM students under Plan I (thesis) must pass written comprehensive examinations in theory, history, and the major area. A description of the written comprehensive examinations is included in the Graduate Handbook of the School of Music. MM students under Plan II (non-thesis) are required to take an oral examination.

 

All students must pass an oral examination. For students under Plan I, the oral examination will be a defense of the thesis. For students under Plan II, the oral examination will be based on the student's coursework in the MM program and will determine the student's ability to articulate a broader perspective derived from that study. For students following Plan II, the oral examination is the final step in the completion of the degree and is administered only after all other requirements have been completed.

 

A minimum of 33 semester hours of graduate work is required to complete any MM degree.

 

For the DMA Degree

Course distribution (hours required beyond the MM degree).
Major area: 20–25 hours, including document (see below for description)
Theory/music history: 18 hours (minimum of 9 in each area)
Pedagogy: 3–6 hours
Electives: 7 hours
 
Recital requirements. In performance, a minimum of three recitals are required. In conducting there is a requirement for a minimum of three concerts, one of which must be a lecture-recital. In composition, the requirement includes a full recital, or equivalent in length, of music written at the DMA level, exclusive of work done on the document.
 
Advisory Committee. A committee shall be appointed to supervise the student's program and progress toward the degree. The constitution of the committee is described in the Graduate Handbook of the School of Music.

 

Written comprehensive examinations. All students must pass written comprehensive examinations in the major area. No student may attempt the written comprehensive examination sooner than the first Fall or Spring semester after successful completion of all required MUS courses. A description of the written comprehensive examinations is included in the Graduate Handbook of the School of Music.
 
Document. In performance, choral conducting, and wind conducting, a final project that includes a research and writing component is required. The subject, content, and length of the project must be approved by the student’s advisory committee. The School of Music offers options for the format of the final project; these are described in detail in the School of Music's Graduate Handbook (available on the School of Music’s website) under "DMA Curriculum Outlines." In composition, there must be a large original work in an unspecified medium, in addition to and distinct from any work done for degree credit in the DMA program. Every project is subject to approval by the student's advisory committee. Work is supervised by the major teacher and the student’s advisory committee.
 
Public lecture. In performance and composition, there is a required 50-minute lecture demonstrating the candidate's ability to communicate about the area of specialization.
 
Language requirement. There is no specific language requirement for the DMA.  Depending on the student's academic program, the advisory committee may require proficiency in a foreign language.
 
Residency requirement. A minimum of two consecutive, full-time academic semesters must be spent in residence at the University; one may consist of a full summer, if approved by the advisory committee. A minimum of 18 semester hours must be earned in residence. Only degree credit may be counted toward the 18 hours.

 

Individual area degree outlines. Complete descriptions of the program in each area of specialization for the DMA are contained in the Graduate Handbook of the School of Music ; this may be secured by contacting the director of graduate studies in music or may be viewed on the School of Music Web page.

 

Additional information on requirements for all graduate degrees is found in the Degree Requirements section of this catalog.


 
Course Descriptions

Music Academics (MUS)

MUS 501 Introduction to Graduate Study in Music. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
An introduction to the basic bibliographic tools and research techniques in music. Offered fall semester.

MUS 502 Film Scoring. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MUS 510 or permission of the instructor.
A study of the art of scoring music for films. The course will examine aesthetics of film scoring and apply it in this course. Offered fall semester. 

MUS 503 Advanced Counterpoint: Canon and Fugue. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
The analysis and writing of fugue, ground bass, variation, and canon. Offered spring semesters of even-numbered years.

MUS 504 Analysis of Tonal Music. Three hours.
Analysis of literature from the 18th and 19th centuries. Analysis focuses on harmonic and contrapuntal techniques, rudimentary linear reduction concepts, harmonic reduction, and form. Offered spring semester.

MUS 505 Studio Techniques in Arranging and Orchestration. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MUS 510 or permission of the instructor.
This course is an approach to arranging and orchestration in both jazz and commercial settings. The emphasis will be placed on writing for the studio orchestra, MIDI instrumentation, and vocal groups with a focus on the 4- to 6-piece group (jazz and commercial). Offered fall semester. 

MUS 506 Advanced Piano Accompanying. Two hours.
Accompanying advanced undergraduate or graduate vocalists and instrumentalists in studio, plus a weekly seminar.

MUS 507 Advanced Analysis. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MUS 307 or equivalent.
Detailed study and analysis of selected scores from 1200 to the present. Offered in summer school only. 

MUS 510 Advanced Arranging. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MUS 310.
Study of current techniques in arranging, including use of symmetrical scales and chords, pedal points, polytonality, and planing techniques. Offered spring semester. 

MUS 511 Analog Electronic Music Techniques. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Composition using classical analog synthesis, tape recording, editing, and mixing techniques. Offered fall semesters of odd-numbered years.

MUS 512 Digital Synthesis Using C Sound. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Fundamental concepts of digitally synthesized sound as implemented in C Sound. Offered fall semesters of even-numbered years.

MUS 514 Advanced Electronic Music: Sampling, Analog, and Digital Synthesis. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MUS 511 or permission of the instructor.
Advanced analog recording, editing, and mixing techniques, sampling, and digital synthesizers. Offered spring semesters of even-numbered years.

MUS 515 Seminar in Musicology. Three hours.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of the instructor.
A survey of developments, methodologies, and bibliographical resources in the field of musicology. Offered according to demand. 

MUS 516 Selected Topics in Music Theory and Analysis. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Selected analytical topics in music theory presented in seminar. Offered spring semester and according to demand.

MUS 518 Schenkerian Analysis. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Linear and graphic analytical and reductive techniques according to the theoretical constructs, practices, and examples of Heinrich Schenker. Offered fall semesters of odd-numbered years.

MUS 519/MUS 520 Advanced Composition. Three hours (each semester).
Creation of large-scale musical compositions. Offered fall and spring semesters and on demand.

MUS 527/MUS 528 Studies in Special Literature. Three hours (each semester).
Materials vary each semester. May be repeated for credit up to four semesters.

MUS 529 Proseminar in Chamber Music History and Literature. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MUS 307 or equivalent.
Survey of chamber music genres and styles from the 17th to the 20th centuries via discussion and analysis of selected works.

MUS 531 College Teaching: Music in Higher Education. Three hours.
Developing competencies and understandings that will contribute to one's becoming a more effective college music instructor. Offered in summer.

MUS 533 Proseminar in Symphonic Literature. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MUS 307 or equivalent.
Survey of the symphonic music repertoire, including the symphony, the symphonic poem, and the concert overture, via discussion and analysis of selected works.

MUS 534 Proseminar in the Music of the Renaissance. Three hours.
An intensive study of the music, the composers, the diverse styles, genres, and techniques, the theoretical and aesthetic principles, and the performance practices associated with music of the Renaissance via reading, listening, and musical analysis.

MUS 535 Proseminar in the Music of the Baroque. Three hours.
An intensive study of the music, the composers, the diverse styles, genres, and techniques, the theoretical and aesthetic principles, and the performance practices associated with Baroque music via reading, listening, and musical analysis.

MUS 536 Proseminar in Opera History and Literature. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MUS 307 or equivalent.
Survey of operatic styles from the 17th to the 20th centuries via discussion and analysis of selected works.

MUS 537 Analysis of Atonal and Serial Music. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Introduction to set theory and twelve-tone theory. Includes analysis of various works of the 20th century. Offered fall semester.


MUS 538 Introduction to Atonal Music. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Analysis of atonal compositions through a study of pitch and pitch class set structures. Offered fall semesters of even-numbered years.

MUS 539 Proseminar in Ethnomusicology. Three hours.
An introduction to the definition, theory, and methodology of ethnomusicology in the context of an examination of the music of selected world cultures.

MUS 540 Pedagogy of Theory. Three hours.
A study of teaching music theory to college undergraduates and the practical application of pedagogical principles in the classroom. Offered spring semesters of odd-numbered years.

MUS 541 The Teaching of Music History and Appreciation. Two hours.
Prerequisites: Two graduate proseminars and/or seminars in music history.
Designed to prepare students in the various music degree programs to teach music history and appreciation courses at the undergraduate level.

MUS 542 Advanced French Diction. Two hours.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of the instructor.
Advanced study of French diction for singers, including IPA and practical application. Offered on demand. 

MUS 543 Advanced German Diction. Two hours.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of the instructor.
Advanced study of German diction for singers, including IPA and practical application. Offered on demand. 

MUS 544 Advanced Italian Diction. Two hours.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of the instructor.
Advanced study of Italian diction for singers, including IPA and practical application. Offered on demand. 

MUS 545 Graduate Vocal Pedagogy. Three hours.
Prerequisites: MUS 444 or equivalent; or permission of the instructor.
A detailed study of the historical and contemporary methods of pedagogy, and analysis of pedagogical problems.

MUS 549 Proseminar in the Music of the Medieval Period. Three hours.
An intensive study of the music, theoretical and aesthetic principles, and the culture of the Medieval period via reading, listening, musical analysis, and discussion.

MUS 550 Proseminar in the Music of the Classical Period. Three hours.
An intensive study of the music, the composers, the diverse styles and techniques, the theoretical and aesthetic principles, and the performance practices associated with music of the pre-classical and classical periods via reading, listening, and musical analysis.

MUS 552 Directed Studies in Piano Pedagogy. One to three hours.
Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study.
Independent research projects in piano pedagogy. Offered each semester. 

MUS 553 Proseminar in the Music of the Romantic Period. Three hours.
An intensive study of the music, the composers, the diverse styles and techniques, the theoretical and aesthetic principles, and the performance practices associated with music of the 19th century via reading, listening, and musical analysis.

MUS 554 Proseminar in Jazz. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
A study of jazz history and performance practices as applied to the performing musician and educator via transcription, analysis, and research. Offered spring semester. 

MUS 556 Advanced Keyboard Harmony. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MUS 406.
An in-depth analysis and applied study of keyboard skills: harmonization, figured-bass, transposition, and open-score reading. Offered spring semesters of odd-numbered years. 

MUS 558 Proseminar in the Music of the 20th Century. Three hours.
An intensive study of the music, the composers, the diverse styles and techniques, the theoretical and aesthetic principles, and the performance practices associated with music composed after 1900 via reading, listening, and musical analysis.

MUS 559 Special Topics in Musicology. Three hours.
Advanced study of a selected topic in musicology. Offered on demand. 

MUS 561 History of the Wind Band and Traditional Literature to 1950. Three hours.
Comprehensive study of band history from the Renaissance to the present, together with a survey of early and traditional wind works of Mozart, Mendelssohn, Berlioz, Holst, Grainger, Poulenc, and others. Offered fall semesters, and during the first summer terms of even-numbered years. 

MUS 562 Contemporary Wind Ensemble Literature. Three hours.
Detailed examination of wind ensemble literature since 1950, with emphasis on performance analysis and conducting techniques in the works of Schuller, Hindemith, Persichetti, Schwantner, Penderecki, Bassett, Krenek, and others. Offered spring semesters, and during the first summer terms of odd-numbered years. 

MUS 563 Projects in Wind Music. Three hours.
Survey of rehearsal techniques and studies in wind performance practices and transcription. Offered fall and spring semesters and during the first summer term.

MUS 564 Wind Ensemble Practicum I. Two hours.
Students are required to participate as conducting assistants and, if assigned, as performers in an instrumental ensemble. Offered fall semester.

MUS 565 Wind Ensemble Practicum II. Two hours.
Continuation of Wind Ensemble Practicum I. Offered spring semester.

MUS 568 Seminar in Wind Literature: Chamber Forms. Two hours.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
An analytical survey of the content and performance practices of selected wind ensemble literature for chamber groups.

MUS 569 Seminar in Wind Literature: Large Forms. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
An analytical survey of the content and performance practices of selected wind ensemble/band literature for large groups.

MUS 571 Choral Literature, 1450–1750. Two hours.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of the instructor.
In-depth survey of choral literature up to 1750. Offered spring semesters of odd-numbered years. 

MUS 572 Choral Literature, 1750–Present. Two hours.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of the instructor.
In-depth survey of choral literature since 1750. Offered spring semesters of even-numbered years.

MUS 574 Graduate Vocal Literature I. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MUS 474 and MUS 475 or equivalent.
In-depth survey of the performance criteria and historical significance of solo vocal literature of the United States, British Isles, Germany, Austria, France, Italy, Spain, and Central/South American. Offered in Alternate years.

MUS 575 Graduate Vocal Literature II. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MUS 474 and MUS 475 or equivalent.
In-depth survey of the performance criteria and historical significance of solo vocal literature of the United States, British Isles, Germany, Austria, France, Italy, Spain, and Central/South American. Offered in Alternate years.

MUS 577 Advanced Organ Literature I. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of the instructor.
A survey of the literature of the organ from the 15th to the 18th centuries. Offered fall semesters of even-numbered years.

MUS 578 Advanced Organ Literature II. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of the instructor.
A survey of the literature of the organ from the 18th century to the present. Offered spring semesters of odd-numbered years.

MUS 581 Liturgy and the Arts and Worship Practices. Two hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
A study of the relationship between liturgy, music, and other related arts, both in history and current practice.

MUS 582 Hymnody. Two hours.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of the instructor.
A study of the history and structure of hymn texts and music with special emphasis on the 20th and 21st centuries.

MUS 583 Church Music Practicum. One hour.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of the instructor.
A course intended to introduce basic materials and to review and develop service- playing skills and interpersonal skills needed by church musicians. Special emphasis given to the accompaniment of choral works, the conducting of those works from the organ console, and improvisation.
 

MUS 591 Readings in Music History. Three hours.

MUS 592 Advanced Choral Conducting. Three hours.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of the instructor.
Representative literature from all periods is studied and conducted. Conducting techniques, rehearsal and vocal techniques, diction, performance practice, and score analysis are emphasized. Offered each semester. May be repeated for credit with varied repertoire.

MUS 593 Advanced Orchestral Conducting. Two hours.
Both class and private sessions are held. This course is a continuation of Orchestral Conducting. More emphasis is placed on musical interpretation and technical improvements toward that end. Class meetings involve conducting piano transcriptions of major symphonic works, as well as videotaping sessions several times per semester. As part of the final examination, students conduct the University Symphony in a half-hour rehearsal/performance. Offered fall semester. 

MUS 594 Advanced Instrumental Conducting. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MUS 493.
Baton technique, score reading, analysis, interpretation, rehearsal techniques, and instrumental problems in a few selected scores. Offered spring semester. 
 

MUS 595 Graduate Theory Review. Three hours.

Intensive review of freshman and sophomore music theory designed for graduate students who do not perform adequately on the Music Theory diagnostic examination at matriculation. A grade no lower than C must be earned in this course if the student is to satisfy the requirement  for remediation.


MUS 596 Comprehensive Examination. No hours.
All master of music students are required to register for this course at the beginning of the semester during which they take the comprehensive examination. A grade will be determined entirely by an assessment of the student's performance on the comprehensive examination and will either be pass or fail. The course may be repeated once and must be passed if the student is to graduate.


MUS 597 Oral Examination. No hours.
All master of music students are required to register for this course at the beginning of the semester during which they take the oral examination. A grade will be determined entirely by an assessment of the student's performance on the oral examination and will either be pass or fail. The course may be repeated once and must be passed if the student is to graduate.

MUS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis. One to three hours. 

MUS 599 Thesis Research. One to three hours.

MUS 608 Advanced Schenkerian Analysis. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MUS 518 or permission of the instructor.
Application of Schenkerian methodologies to large-scale tonal works. Offered spring semesters of even-numbered years.

MUS 609 Serialism. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Twelve-tone serial techniques and the analysis of serial and serial-informed compositions. Offered spring semesters of odd-numbered years.


MUS 611 Advanced Digital Synthesis Using C Sound. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MUS 512 or permission of the instructor.
Instrument design and compositional issues related to digital synthesis using C Sound. Offered spring semesters of odd-numbered years.

MUS 615 Special Topics in Musicology and Ethnomusicology. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of the instructor.
Advanced study of a selected topic in musicology or ethnomusicology.

MUS 617 History of Music Theory. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of the instructor.
Historical survey of theoretical systems in music from the ancient Greeks to the present. Offered according to demand. 

MUS 619/MUS 620 Advanced Composition. Four hours each semester.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Offered in summer school. 

MUS 622 Seminar in Medieval and Renaissance Music. Three hours.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and MUS 501.
An intensive study of a specific topic associated with Medieval and/or Renaissance music. Topic varies.

MUS 623 Seminar in Baroque Music. Three hours.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and MUS 501.
An intensive study of a specific topic associated with Baroque music. Topic varies.

MUS 624 Seminar in Classical Music. Three hours.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and MUS 501.
An intensive study of a specific topic associated with the music of the classical period. Topic varies.

MUS 625 Seminar in Romantic Music. Three hours.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and MUS 501.
An intensive study of a specific topic associated with 19th-century music. Topic varies.

MUS 626 Seminar in 20th-Century Music. Three hours.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and MUS 501.
An intensive study of a specific topic associated with music written in the 20th century. Topic varies.

MUS 642 Advanced Vocal Pedagogy. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of the instructor.
An analytical survey of voice teaching with emphasis on practical application. Offered on demand. 

MUS 643 Brass/Woodwind/String Pedagogy. One to three hours.
Intended to teach doctoral students how to be successful in applied studio teaching at the collegiate and preparatory level. The focus of the course will be specific relative to the student's major instrument. Offered each semester. 

MUS 650 Instrumental Conducting Pedagogy. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
A practical and theoretical study of conducting instruction.

MUS 651 Choral Conducting Pedagogy. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
A practical and theoretical study of conducting instruction.

MUS 652 Special Topics in Vocal Literature. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MUS 474 and MUS 475 or equivalent.
In-depth survey of the performance criteria and historical significance of selected repertoire from the solo vocal literature.

MUS 653 Special Topics in Vocal Literature. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MUS 474 and MUS 475 or equivalent.
In-depth survey of the performance criteria and historical significance of selected repertoire from the solo vocal literature.

MUS 671 Performance Seminar in Piano Literature. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MM in piano or permission of the instructor.
A consideration of performance practice in important segments of piano literature. Offered according to demand. 

MUS 672 Performance Seminar in the Literature of Music for Piano and Orchestra. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MM in piano or permission of the instructor.
A consideration of the musical, technical, and practical aspects of playing piano concertos. Offered according to demand.

MUS 674 Topics in Choral Literature. Two hours.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of the instructor.
A thorough analysis and historical study of the repertoire for the lecture recital. May be repeated for credit.

MUS 675 Topics in Wind Literature. Two hours.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
A thorough analysis and historical study of the repertoire for the recital.

MUS 677 Topics in Organ Literature. Three hours.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of the instructor.
In-depth study of the organ literature of a specific period, its content and performance practice related to the organs of the period, and the performance of the literature. Offered each semester. May be repeated for credit if literature varies.

MUS 692 Advanced Choral Conducting. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Advanced conducting techniques, score analysis and preparation, performance practice and interpretation, rehearsal, and vocal techniques and diction.

MUS 694 Advanced Instrumental Conducting. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Advanced baton technique, score reading, interpretation, rehearsal techniques, and instrumental problems in selected scores. 

MUS 696 Comprehensive Examination. No hours.
All doctor of musical arts students are required to register for this course at the beginning of the semester during which they take the comprehensive examination. A grade will be determined entirely by an assessment of the student's performance on the comprehensive examination and will either be pass or fail. The course may be repeated once and must be passed if the student is to graduate.

MUS 697 Oral Examination. No hours.
All doctor of musical arts students are required to register for this course at the beginning of the semester during which they take the oral examination. A grade will be determined entirely by an assessment of the student's performance on the oral examination and will either be pass or fail. The course may be repeated once and must be passed if the student is to graduate.

MUS 698 Research Not Related to Dissertation. One to three hours. 

MUS 699 Document Research. One to six hours. 



Music, Applied (MUA)

Studio instruction. The 500 level of applied study indicates graduate standing; the 600 level indicates doctoral standing. Master's students register for applied study at the 500 level, doctoral students at the 600 level. Each instrument carries its own numerical designation. The numbering pattern follows the order found in the current UA undergraduate catalog under course listings for music, applied.
 
MUA 500 Level Studio Instrumental and Vocal Study. One, two, or four hours (each semester). Prerequisites: Graduate standing and audition. Private instruction. 

MUA 501 Secondary Applied Study. One hour. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and audition.
Private instruction. 

MUA 600 Level Studio Instrumental and Vocal Study. One, two, or four hours (each semester). Prerequisites: Doctoral standing and audition. Private instruction. 


Graduate Ensembles. One hour (each semester). The ensembles listed below may be taken for graduate credit. MM performance majors are required to earn 2 semester hours of ensemble credit (1 hour in each of two different semesters) and, like all MM students may apply semester 2 hours (in addition to those required of them) as elective credits toward the degree. DMA students may apply a maximum of 4 semester hours as elective credit. All graduate ensemble credits are graded pass/fail.

MUA 550 Symphony Orchestra
MUA 552 Wind Ensemble
MUA 558 Contemporary Music Ensemble
MUA 559 Jazz Ensemble
MUA 560 Opera Workshop
MUA 563 University Singers
MUA 569 Chamber Music

 


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