THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA GRADUATE SCHOOL

Annual Report and Statistical Analysis

2001-2002

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. List of Tables
2. List of Figures
3. Burnum Distinguished Faculty Award
4. Blackmon-Moody Outstanding Professor
5. Meet our Graduate Students
 
6. Introduction
7. Enhancements
8. Review of the Year
9. Recruitment Activities
 
10. Admissions
11. Enrollment
12. African-American Enrollment
13. Female Enrollment
14. International Enrollment
15. Domestic Students
 
16. Graduate Student Credit Hours
17. Communications Media
18. Electronic Applications
19. The Graduate Council
20. Qualifications of the Graduate Faculty
21. Degree Programs
 
22. Graduate Student Financial Support
23. Minority Graduate Student Financial Support
24. Graduate Assistantships
25. Workshop for New Graduate Teaching Assistants
26. Awards
27. Academic Common Market

 

1. LIST OF TABLES

1. GRADUATE APPLICATIONS SPRING TO FALL 2001 AND SUMMARY BY DEGREE SOUGHT
2. GRADUATE APPLICATIONS BY DEPARTMENT SPRING TO FALL 2001
3. OFF-CAMPUS GRADUATE APPLICATIONS COMPLETED SPRING TO FALL 2001
4. FALL ENROLLMENT 1997 TO 2001
5. GRADUATE ENROLLMENT SPRING TO FALL 2001
6. GRADUATE ENROLLMENT FALL 2001 ANALYSIS BY STATE OF ORIGIN
7. ON-CAMPUS GRADUATE ENROLLMENT BY ACADEMIC PROGRAM FALL 2001
8. ON-CAMPUS AFRICAN-AMERICAN GRADUATE ENROLLMENT FALL 1997 TO 2001
9. GRADUATE ENROLLMENT OF INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS BY DEPARTMENT FALL 1999 TO 2001
10. GRADUATE ENROLLMENT OF INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS BY COUNTRY OF ORIGIN FALL 2000 AND 2001
11. ON-CAMPUS GRADUATE STUDENT CREDIT HOURS 2000-2001
12. COMMENCEMENT ACTIVITY 2000-2001
13. NUMBER OF DEGREE RECIPIENTS 1996-97 TO 2000-2001
14. DEGREES AWARDED 2000-2001
15. DEGREES AWARDED BY ACADEMIC PROGRAM 1999-2000 AND 2000-2001
16. THE GRADUATE COUNCIL, THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA
17. FINANCIAL SUPPORT FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 1999-2000 AND 2000-2001
18. GRADUATE COUNCIL THESIS/DISSERTATION FELLOWSHIPS 1996-97 TO 2000-2001
19. GRADUATE COUNCIL RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS 1997-98 TO 2000-2001
20. GRADUATE COUNCIL REGULAR FELLOWSHIPS 1996-97 TO 2000-2001
21. CURRENT GRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
22. FINANCIAL AID
23. NUMBER AND TYPE OF GRADUATE ASSISTANTS APPOINTED FALL 2001, ANALYSIS BY COLLEGE
24. NUMBER AND TYPE OF GRADUATE ASSISTANTS APPOINTED FALL 2001, ANALYSIS BY DEPARTMENT
25. NUMBER AND TYPE OF FULL TIME EQUIVALENT GRADUATE ASSISTANTS APPOINTED FALL 2001, ANALYSIS BY FUNDING SOURCE BY COLLEGE
26. NUMBER AND TYPE OF FULL TIME EQUIVALENT GRADUATE ASSISTANTS APPOINTED FALL 2001, ANALYSIS BY FUNDING SOURCE BY DEPARTMENT
27. GRADUATE ASSISTANTS TOTAL STIPEND AWARDS FALL 2001, ANALYSIS BY TYPE OF ASSISTANT BY COLLEGE
28. GRADUATE ASSISTANTS TOTAL STIPEND AWARDS FALL 2001, ANALYSIS BY TYPE OF ASSISTANT BY DEPARTMENT
29. GRADUATE ASSISTANTS TOTAL STIPEND PAYMENTS, ACADEMIC YEAR 2000-2001, ANALYSIS BY FUNDING SOURCE BY COLLEGE
30. GRADUATE ASSISTANTS TOTAL STIPEND PAYMENTS, ACADEMIC YEAR 2000-2001, ANALYSIS BY FUNDING SOURCE BY DEPARTMENT
31. GRADUATE ASSISTANTS AVERAGE FULL TIME EQUIVALENT STIPENDS, FALL 2001 APPOINTMENTS, ANALYSIS BY FUNDING SOURCE BY COLLEGE
32. GRADUATE ASSISTANTS AVERAGE FULL TIME EQUIVALENT STIPENDS, FALL 2001 APPOINTMENTS, ANALYSIS BY FUNDING SOURCE BY DEPARTMENT
33. NON-UNIVERSITY FUNDS 2000-2001 SOURCES
34. ACADEMIC COMMON MARKET PROGRAMS
35. STAFF DIRECTORY, GRADUATE SCHOOL

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2. LIST OF FIGURES
1. KEY INDICATOR TRENDS
2. FALL ENROLLMENT 1997 TO 2001
3. ON-CAMPUS AFRICAN-AMERICAN ENROLLMENT 1997 TO 2001
4. INTERNATIONAL ENROLLMENT BY COUNTRY FALL 2001
5. GRADUATE ENROLLMENT, STATE OF ORIGIN
6. ON-CAMPUS GRADUATE STUDENT CREDIT HOURS 2000-2001
7. GRADUATE DEGREES CONFERRED
8. GRADUATE ASSISTANTS FALL 1997 TO 2001

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3. BURNUM DISTINGUISHED FACULTY AWARD

BURNUM DISTINGUISHED FACULTY AWARD:
Dr. Dolf Zillmann

 

Dr. Dolf Zillmann, senior associate dean for graduate studies and research in the College of Communication and Information Sciences, is the recipient of the 2001 Burnum Distinguished Faculty Award at The University of Alabama.

The Burnum Award is one of the highest honors the University bestows on its faculty. Dr. and Mrs. John F. Burnum of Tuscaloosa established the award to recognize and promote excellence in research, scholarship and teaching. Each year, a faculty member, who has demonstrated superior scholarly or artistic achievements and profound dedication to the art of teaching, is chosen by the faculty selection committee to receive this prestigious honor.

Prior to coming to The University of Alabama in 1989, Dr. Zillmann taught at both the University of Pennsylvania and Indiana University, and has served as visiting professor at numerous universities in Europe. He has written and collaborated on a number of academic publications and also serves as co-editor with Dr. Jennings Bryant on an academic book series, "Media Effects: Advances in Theory and Research." His latest book, "Media Entertainment: The Psychology of Its Appeal," is quickly becoming an academic best seller in the United States.

Dr. Zillmannn's research explores the connections between sexuality and aggression, focusing extensively on the emotional aspects of violent and emotional behavior in society and the media. His more recent work has expanded into the function of empathy with others' emotions. The empathy concept is central to his teaching and research in the psychology and psychophysiology of entertainment, including comedy, erotica, suspense, horror, tragedy, music and even sports.

According to Dr. E. Culpepper Clark, Dean of the College of Communication and Information Sciences, "Over the last decade, we have joined the ranks of the nation's elite in providing academic talent. We could not have gotten there so fast or with as much quality had it not been for the leadership of Dr. Zillmannn."

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4. BLACKMON-MOODY OUTSTANDING PROFESSOR
 

BLACKMON-MOODY OUTSTANDING PROFESSOR:
Dr. David P. Hale

 

The Blackmon-Moody Award is for a faculty member whose "singular, exceptional, or timely work, whether in the form of research, a product, a program, or published material, reflects credit on the faculty member, the field of study, students and The University of Alabama."

In 2001, Dr. David P. Hale, Director of the Management Information Systems Program in the Culverhouse College of Commerce and Business Administration, is the recipient of the Blackmon-Moody Award. Since joining the University in the fall of 1995, Dr. Hale rapidly developed the MIS program that is producing among the world's best information technology professionals. His success stems from his active engagement with faculty from other College of Business departments, the College of Engineering's Computer Science faculty, Alabama community college administrators and faculty, business leaders from within the state of Alabama, leading information systems professionals from across the country, and the National Science Foundation.

Dr. Hale is responsible for the establishment of the MIS/MBA program at The University of Alabama, which is now (after only four years) ranked fourth in the nation by ComputerWorld. Starting in 1997, he has directed a State of Alabama initiative called Information Technology Workforce Development Centers (IT-WoRCs) that has held Computing Olympiads throughout the state of Alabama to improve IT career awareness to traditionally underrepresented groups.

Thanks to Dr. Hale's work, The University of Alabama's Management Information Systems Program has garnered national recognition as one of the premier programs in the country.

 

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5. MEET OUR GRADUATE STUDENTS
 

Erika Steele

After completing her B.S. degree in biology at The University of Alabama,
Erika Steele entered the graduate program in biology to focus on cell and molecular biology. She has been a graduate teaching assistant in the Department of Biology and is now pursuing her Ph.D. degree. She was selected to participate in the prestigious Alabama Commission on Higher Education/Southern Regional Education Board Doctoral Scholars Program. Her graduate research focuses on expression of the swallow gene, which play an important role in fruit fly development. After graduation, she plans to pursue her love of science as a research scientist and university faculty member.

Sean Ford

Sean Ford, a Ph.D. student in the Department of English has studied American literature throughout his academic career. During his doctoral program at the University of Alabama, he has had several important publications and one publication forthcoming, has been a graduate teaching assistant of undergraduate composition and literature classes, and has served as an instructor at Shelton State Community College in Tuscaloosa. He has chosen the work of Herman Melville for his doctoral dissertation and was selected to receive a University of Alabama Graduate Council Dissertation Fellowship to assist with his research project. He plans to continue his research and college teaching after receipt of his degree.

 

Randall Stewart

Randy Stewart worked as a manager of personnel and finance, a bank auditor, and an accountant before entering the Ph.D. program in the Department of Management and Marketing. He is focusing on strategy and health care management during his doctoral studies. He was awarded a Graduate Council Research Fellowship for a project to survey physicians about the relationship between workplace characteristics and outcomes for patients. Following his doctoral studies, he plans to become a university professor and researcher and to develop policy and strategy for the most effective delivery of health care services.

Huateng Yang

Huateng Yang received his master's degree from Shanghai Jiao Tong University and then joined the University of Alabama as Ph.D. student in the Department of Mechanical Engineering. He received a regular Graduate Council Fellowship for his first year of graduate studies at the University. He has considerable experience and published technical papers on electronic engine control systems. He is focusing on internal combustion engines during his doctoral studies.

Daryl Harris

Daryl Harris is pursuing a Ph.D. in Interdisciplinary Studies. While taking coursework in English, theater, communication, and African-American Studies, he is focusing his studies on trans-cultural alternative theater and dramatic literature. He has received a Future Faculty Fellowship to assist with his doctoral studies. He has worked in the theater departments of UA and Shelton State Community College in Tuscaloosa, is an active participant in Theatre Tuscaloosa, and currently is a theater instructor at Stillman College. His goal is to continue college and university teaching of theater courses, to research the community building aspects of theater across cultures, and to establish a campus and community based educational theater company that concentrates on works by and about American ethnic groups.

Charlotte Horton

Charlotte Horton received her bachelor's and master's degrees in early childhood education from UA and worked for almost 20 years as a teacher in schools in Tuscaloosa. She has returned to UA fulltime to purse a master's degree in Human Development and Family studies and in the future will pursue a doctorate. She also holds a graduate assistantship. Her years of teaching led to an interest in early cognitive learning theory and scientific findings regarding brain development, and she is pursuing her study of these areas during her master's program. She hopes to translate scientific findings about children's development into formal educational methods for young learners.

Sondra Yarbrough

Sondra Yarbrough distinguished herself as an outstanding mathematics educator in the St. Clair County schools for 16 years before enrolling at The University of Alabama. She earned an Ed.S. degree in Secondary Education in 1996 and a Ph.D. in 2001. During her UA career she earned the title of Graduate Teaching Fellow, working to prepare new graduate teaching assistants for their roles as instructors. She won the University's award for Outstanding Teaching by a Doctoral Student in 2001 and currently is teaching in the College of Education and influencing the lives of many future educators for the State of Alabama.

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6. INTRODUCTION
 
Welcome once again to the Annual Report and Statistical Analysis of The Graduate School for the 2001-2002 academic year. We are delighted that you are visiting with us and hope that the information contained in this booklet will be interesting and useful. The entire document can be found on the Graduate School's web site at graduate.ua.edu. For more information about any data contained in this report please contact the Director of Administration at The Graduate School, 102 Rose Administration.

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7. ENHANCEMENTS
As the oldest and most comprehensive graduate institution in the state, The University of Alabama has an obligation to strengthen existing graduate programs. Strong graduate programs attract external research funding and promising graduate students to the state, and support the recruitment and retention of high-tech industry. One of the objectives of the University's strategic plan for 1998-2003 was to provide support for graduate programs. Programs are selected on the basis of current quality and feasibility of the program's strategic plan for improvement.

This year, the Department of Biological Sciences received Graduate Program Enhancement Funding for its Aquatic Ecology and Systematics Graduate Program.

The aim of this enhancement is to capture leadership as the premier graduate program linking Aquatic Biodiversity with Ecosystem Dynamics. The enhancement will enable the department to compete more effectively for top graduate students with four Ph.D. fellowships and three Ph.D. graduate research assistantships. The range of interdisciplinary training for students will be expanded with the hiring of two new faculty - a conservation biologist and a higher trophic level ecologist.

To increase their professional skills, graduate students will write grant proposals for pilot support of special and innovative research ventures where the graduate student is the primary designer of the research initiative. An increased number of broadly-trained Ph.D. students who can increase our understanding of the bases for sustainability of life in aquatic systems and who can explore solutions to problems in water quality will be produced as a result of this program.

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8. REVIEW OF THE YEAR
In common with many graduate institutions the number of students seeking application to the University of Alabama was lower than last year - total applications received were 5,675 (last year - 6,040). However, contrary to the experience of many of our fellow institutions we have maintained almost the same level of enrollment at 3,340 (last year - 3,385). This has been achieved through continuing and concerted efforts to maintain our recruitment activities especially against the background of current financial and economic constraint.

Graduate departments continued to benefit from White Paper enhancements including new graduate assistantship positions, enhanced minimum stipend levels, and new graduate faculty. Total financial support for all graduate students was $19,668,590, up almost 5% on the previous year. This included increased tuition support amounting to $5,429,978 (last year - $5,288,824) and the number of students receiving graduate assistantships was 1,232. The average annual stipend for a 050 FTE assistantship was $9,400, up by over 2%.

The total number of international students enrolling was the same as last year - 505 - with the greatest number in Mechanical Engineering (38). Once again, the largest international contingent came from China (178). The number of degrees awarded stayed at the same level as last year with 166 doctoral degrees, 73 Ed.S.'s, and 1,121 master's totaling 1,360 (last year 1,359).

The total number of credit hours enrolled by graduate students amounted to 55,931 which was slightly higher than last year's 55,083. Please refer to FIGURE 1: Key Indicator Trends

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9. RECRUITMENT ACTIVITIES
The 2000-2001 academic year saw significant recruitment travel by the UA Graduate School. Our recruiters made visits to 37 recruitment events at over 44 colleges and universities. A number of historically black institutions were targeted for recruitment visits. Following each visit, the Graduate School representative developed a list of prospective graduate applicants and wrote each a follow-up letter. A memorandum was sent to each UA graduate department chair, giving the details of students interested in that department's programs. The Graduate School has implemented plans to maintain an active role in graduate recruitment events in 2001-2002.

The Graduate School organizes a large number of on-campus recruitment activities. In October 2000 and September 2001, the Graduate School sponsored its annual Preview Day on "Applying to Graduate School," which was attended each year by over 400 undergraduates at UA and other colleges and universities. The Preview Days consisted of presentations by Graduate School recruiters on the application process and by UA departmental representatives on graduate opportunities in specific fields of study. Breakout sessions included the Arts & Sciences divisions of Physical Sciences/Mathematics, Social Sciences, and Fine Arts/Humanities; Commerce and Business Administration; Communication and Information Sciences; Education; Engineering; Human Environmental Sciences; and Social Work. The Preview Days concluded with practice administrations of graduate admissions tests, provided at no charge by Kaplan, Inc. The attendees continue to be monitored regularly to ensure that as many as possible decide to enroll in graduate school.

On October 10, 2000 and October 9, 2001, the annual Graduate and Professional School Day was held in the Ferguson Center. Universities from across the country exhibited and provided information to prospective graduate students.

On the first Wednesday of every month, the Graduate School conducts a seminar on "Applying to Graduate School." The seminar is listed on the Graduate School's virtual site and is promoted by the various departments and support groups across the UA campus. The seminar also is advertised widely on other campuses across the state.

Graduate School staff members conduct presentations for a large number of campus organizations, including honor societies, undergraduate organizations, undergraduate classes, and many other units. For example, in 2000-2001, Graduate School representatives conducted presentations for prospective graduate students at the UA English Language Institute, National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Summer Program, and McNair Scholars Program. Emphasis continues on maintaining links and dialogue with all undergraduate organizations concerning graduate admissions procedures and highlighting the benefits of investing in graduate education. The Graduate School stresses the importance of developing a personal contact with all outstanding undergraduate students (those who have maintained a 3.00 GPA) and encourages them to consider attending the Graduate School at the UA.

Graduate School staff members conduct a number of admissions and recruitment activities on a daily basis in our office in 102 Rose Administration Building, activities that include phone calls from applicants, voice mail messages, sessions with individual students in our offices, processing applications, mailing applications and catalogs to prospective students, phone calls from faculty and other units, and responding to e-mail inquiries from faculty and prospective students. During this past year (June 2000 through May 2001) the Graduate School received and processed over 24,000 pieces of mail related to applications. The Graduate School admissions staff conducted over 1,800 in-office guidance sessions with prospective graduate students and had almost 2,900 additional office visits from students with application questions. The admissions staff had 8,800 phone calls and responded to over 11,000 e-mails from applicants.

The success of graduate student recruitment is dependent upon the active involvement of individual graduate departments and faculty. Graduate students often select a university based on the research and scholarly record and reputation of each department's faculty. Prospective graduate students who have been contacted directly by department chairs or faculty are more likely to apply to a university. Thus, the Graduate School has implemented a number of activities to assist departments with their own departmental graduate recruitment programs. Every fall semester, the Graduate School holds a seminar for new department chairs and graduate program directors and provides information about possible recruitment activities. Each semester, the Graduate School sponsors a recruitment focus group for 10-15 Graduate Program Directors. Graduate School staff members routinely are invited to attend departmental faculty meetings to discuss graduate student recruitment, application, and admission.

As part of the continuing process of assisting departments, the Graduate School maintains and uses several prospect databases. Over 500 inquiries from prospective graduate students are entered into the database each month, and reports are sent regularly to each department in which the students have expressed a specific interest. The Graduate School actively solicits national databases of prospective graduate students (e.g., the McNair Scholars Program for undergraduates who are from disadvantaged groups or are first-generation college students) and forwards the information to departments. The Graduate School also routinely sends reports to departments about potential outstanding applicants who have submitted parts of their applications (e.g., transcripts, test scores) and who can be encouraged by departments to complete their applications and attend The University of Alabama Graduate School. Developments and improvements within the application cycle also contribute to keeping graduate application and enrollment levels high. In particular, the use of technology in communication further enhances the recruiting process. The Graduate School has an electronic version of its application on its virtual site. The online graduate application facilitates rapid processing of applications while reducing the amount of paperwork usually associated with the admissions process. During 2000-2001, over 33% graduate applications were submitted on our web site. Students who wish to apply electronically can do so by visiting www.graduate.ua.edu.

In recent years, a number of enhancements have been made to the Graduate School online application, and additional enhancements are planned. We have recently changed our virtual site to allow online submission of applications from international students, in addition to U.S. citizens. Students who do not choose to apply online often download and print our forms from the Web site and submit paper copies of our forms through US mail. We have implemented procedures to allow better tracking and recruitment of applicants who apply using our online application. When applicants submit an online application, an email is sent automatically to the department to which they have applied; departments are encouraged to use the data for recruitment of the students. Applicants are automatically sent emails immediately and several weeks following their submission of the online application. The emails thank applicants for their applications and encourage them to consider enrolling at UA. Beginning in October 2000, data from online applications are uploaded automatically into the university's student information system. Online graduate applicants now may submit credit card numbers for their application fees. UA has enhanced its virtual site for students (www.tideguide.ua.edu), and students may and check the status of their graduate applications on this site.

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10. ADMISSIONS
The University of Alabama Graduate School continues to benefit from its extensive recruitment activities. The Graduate School received 4,852 applications for admission to degree programs for spring, summer and fall semesters in 2001, which is comparable to 5,038 degree applications in 2000. A large number of degree applications were completed and reviewed by departments --- 3,808 in 2001 compared with 3,869 in 2000. The quality of degree applications was similar to last year, and an acceptance rate of 59.4% was maintained in 2001, compared to 58.9% in 2000. The degree applications completed in 2001 resulted in 2,261 acceptances, 1,013 rejections, and 534 awaiting departmental decisions. In addition, a total of 823 non-degree applications and 607 off-campus degree applications were received in 2001. For a more detailed analysis of admissions and applications, please refer to Tables 1, 2, and 3.

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11. ENROLLMENT
As shown in FIGURE 2, total graduate enrollment at the University of Alabama for fall 2001 was 3,340, which continues the trend of high enrollment levels over the last few years. The highest levels of enrollment in 1994 of 3,600 students and 1995 of 3,530 students were followed by a drop to 3,322 in 1996 and 3,253 in 1997. Since 1997, enrollment increased and now remains relatively stable at about 3,300 to 3,400 graduate students. Total on-campus enrollment in the Graduate School in fall semester 2001 was 2,901. Off-campus enrollment was 439 graduate students in fall 2001. Some divisions showed substantial increases in fall 2001, compared to the previous year. Higher enrollment in the College of Human Environmental Sciences (31% increase), Capstone College of Nursing (10.3% increase), and College of Engineering (9% increase) was partially offset by reductions in other colleges' enrollment. Excluding the categories of non-degree and off-campus students, the total enrollment was 2,704 --virtually the same level as last year (2,697). For a more detailed analysis of enrollment for 2001, please refer to Tables 4, 5, 6, and 7.

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12. AFRICAN-AMERICAN ENROLLMENT
The Graduate School continues to be committed to the recruitment, enrollment, retention, and graduation of minority graduate students. While efforts supporting this commitment involve individuals from a variety of underrepresented groups, African-Americans receive particular attention. During 2000-2001, the Graduate School recruitment staff continued to visit historically black institutions and engage in other activities to recruit minority students. Recognizing the benefits of recruiting UA undergraduate students, the Graduate School also personally contacts outstanding UA minority students and hosts a reception for them. The Graduate School continues actively to recruit students through services and publications directed toward minority students.

African-Americans comprised 9.5% of on-campus graduate enrollment in the fall of 2001, with 277 students enrolled. Enrollment of African-American graduate students has steadily increased from 81 students in 1987 (3% of the total graduate enrollment) and remained stable with 200-225 students (6-7% of the total enrollment) from 1994 to 1997, as seen in FIGURE 1. The last few years have seen high even higher enrollment of African-American graduate students, with 245 students in fall 1998, 262 in fall 1999, 289 in fall 2000, and 277 in fall 2001 (see FIGURE 3 and TABLE 8).

The number of minority students receiving graduate degrees at the University also remains high. We awarded graduate degrees to 131 minority students in 2000-2001 (summer, fall, and spring terms), which is 9.63% of our total number of graduate degree recipients. Similarly, in 1999-2000, we awarded graduate degrees to 139 minority students, or 10.23% of graduate degree recipients. In 1998-1999 and 1997-1998, we awarded 119 and 106 degrees, respectively, to minority graduate students.

The Graduate School has received national recognition for its graduation rates for African American students. The Graduate School and several individual graduate programs were recognized in the July 19, 2001 issue of the journal Black Issues in Higher Education, which contained the annual report of the "Top 100 Graduate Degree Producers." The data reflected numbers of graduate degrees awarded in 1999-2000. The University of Alabama Graduate School received the following ranks:

All Disciplines Combined-African American Doctorate UA tied for rank of 43
Communications--African American Master's UA tied for rank of 33
Engineering--African American Master's  UA tied for rank of 44
Psychology--African American Master's  UA tied for rank of 58
Education--African American Doctorate UA tied for rank of 30

To increase minority graduate enrollment and graduation, the University of Alabama Graduate School makes substantial efforts to ensure that minority students receive needed financial assistance. Since 1988, the Graduate School has provided scholarships, fellowships, and stipends for over 170 minority graduate scholars and has funded minority graduate students for over $2 million in stipends and tuition scholarships. In 2000-2001 (summer, fall, and spring terms), 33 students were supported through stipends and/or tuition scholarships for a total of $159,499. Due to expanded Graduate School recruitment and fellowship activities, there were more participants in the minority graduate fellowship programs during 2000-2001 than in any previous year.

Several programs are in place to provide targeted financial assistance for minority groups in conjunction with other bodies. For example, the Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) Minority Doctoral Scholars program is in its seventh year and provides stipends for minority students at the University, while the Graduate School funds tuition scholarships. For some Minority Doctoral Scholars, the Graduate School has a partnership with SREB to provide half of a $12,000 annual stipend plus full tuition support. Similar forms of support include the Joint Faculty Development Program and the Future Faculty Fellows Program, which provide substantial assistance to African-American students who plan to become college or university professors. Financial support is also provided for participants in the Joint Faculty/Staff Development Program with Stillman College, an HBCU in Tuscaloosa. The numerous Graduate School fellowship and scholarship programs are described in detail in following sections. In addition, prospective minority students are directed to fellowships, assistantships, scholarships, and other sources of financial aid for which they may apply.

The Minority Graduate Student Assistance Office offers a variety of support services for students. The Graduate School provides funds and support for the UA African-American Graduate Student Association, which had been inactive for several years before becoming active again in fall 1998. The group sponsors panel discussions, information fairs, and receptions. The African-American Graduate Student Association remains a very active association on campus. The association's president serves as a representative to the Graduate Council. The Graduate School provides travel funds for officers to attend the National Black Graduate Student Conferences each year.

The Graduate School assisted the UA TRIO office in obtaining a U.S. Department of Education grant for the Ronald E. McNair Post Baccalaureate Achievement Program, a research training program for undergraduates who wish to pursue graduate study, and was active in implementation of the UA McNair program during 2000. An Associate Dean of the Graduate School serves on the UA McNair Scholars Advisory Board. The Graduate School has agreed to provide tuition scholarships for any UA McNair scholar who attends graduate school at UA and to assist UA McNair scholars with identifying and applying for departmental graduate assistantships. We have conducted recruitment activities for McNair fellows in the Southern region and pay the graduate application fee for any McNair fellow who applies to UA. The UA Student Support Services Program is another U.S. Department of Education TRIO program for undergraduate scholars from disadvantaged groups. The Graduate School also pays the application fees and provides assistance on applying to graduate programs for participants in the UA Student Support Services Program. See FIGURE 3.

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13. FEMALE ENROLLMENT
In line with the University's declared goal of ensuring that female representation at all levels continues to improve, the Graduate School was successful in maintaining its high ratio of female students. In fall 2001, 1,899 graduate students were women, representing over 56% of the total, the same as last fall. A full analysis of the recruitment of female graduate students appears in Table 5.

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14. INTERNATIONAL ENROLLMENT
The total number of international students attracted to the university for graduate study was exactly the same as last year - 505! The largest contingent of overseas students is studying in the College of Engineering (232) with Arts & Sciences at 140 and Commerce and Business Administration at 57. Please refer to Tables 9 and 10 for more information on international students. For a graphical presentation, see FIGURE 4.

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15. DOMESTIC STUDENTS
Over 2,000 students were enrolled in Fall 2001 from within the state of Alabama, roughly the same level as last year (2,052). Outside of our own state, Georgia sent the largest contingent numbering 149. Mississippi was in second place with 86 students, with Tennessee sending 63. Details in FIGURE 5.

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16. GRADUATE STUDENT CREDIT HOURS
Credit hours enrolled increased again this year reversing the decline from a peak in 1999. Total hours were 55,931 up almost 2% over last year. The average number of hours per enrolled student was 20.1 compared with 18.8 last year and 19.1 in the previous year. Details in FIGURE 6.

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17. COMMUNICATIONS MEDIA
The Graduate School provides up-to-date information to faculty and students through our website, which is constantly maintained in-house to ensure that all of the information and assistance are current, accurate, and relevant to all users and readers. We also provide current copies of all of our principal publications in printed version as in our experience there remains a sizeable group of our customers who prefer the portability and familiarity of several of our guides and handbooks.

Copies of administrative updates, information, and other important documents are similarly published and maintained. The calendar is another significant addition to the site and includes all key dates for deadlines for students, staff, and faculty in all areas of the Graduate School's activities. The contents of this Annual Report for each year since 1997 are made available to everyone through our web pages. In addition, there are links to graduate departments in colleges, on-line forms for masters and doctoral students, perpetual calendar, and numerous other documents. The whole spectrum of the Graduate School's resources is made available to students, faculty, and administrators, and the site is maintained on a weekly basis to ensure accuracy. The Graduate School's web site address is: http://graduate.ua.edu.

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18. ELECTRONIC APPLICATIONS
An electronic version of the Graduate School application is available on our web site, and this continues to be used more and more by prospective students. During this latest year our functionality for assisting students has been further enhanced with the introduction of our electronic payment of application fees. When completing and submitting their application via our web site and electronic application form, students may now make their application fee payment using any one of the major credit cards. In addition to ensuring that all applications received are accompanied by the correct payment, this process enables the student to retain an electronic record of the whole application process.

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19. THE GRADUATE COUNCIL
The Graduate Council, composed of 23 elected, 7 appointed, and 4 ex-officio members, is the body responsible for recommending new policies and reviewing existing regulations governing advanced programs at The University of Alabama. Each elected or appointed member serves on one of five committees: Research and New Programs; Financial Aid; Admissions and Recruitment; Program and Degree Requirements; or Teaching and Research Awards. A full list of the current members is shown in Table 16.

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20. QUALIFICATIONS OF THE GRADUATE FACULTY
The purpose of the graduate faculty of The University of Alabama is to set standards for graduate work and to provide graduate instruction. It is the responsibility of the graduate faculty in each division to elect its representative(s) to the Graduate Council, which acts for the faculty in matters relating to graduate work. There are three categories of members: full, associate, and temporary. Only members of the graduate faculty may teach courses numbered 500 or above, and only members of the graduate faculty may chair thesis and examining committees. Only full members may chair dissertation committees.

Criteria for full and associate members. The dean of each academic division has the annual responsibility of nominating members who meet the following criteria to serve on the graduate faculty:

 

I. A. Hold the Ph.D. or other terminal degree, and
B. Hold the rank of at least assistant professor in a full-time, tenure-track position.

 

II. Full and associate members must demonstrate ability and continuing interest in the graduate program and in research or creative activity. Full members must show a strong, continuing record of productive research, publication, creative activity, and scholarly activity appropriate to the discipline. These broad requirements are best interpreted by each department and college considering their unique aspects.

 

III. A. Be recommended by the departmental graduate faculty, department chairperson, and dean of the academic division.
B. The chairperson of the Graduate Council's Committee on Graduate Faculty
Membership will then act upon these nominations, in consultation with the dean of the Graduate School.

 

Terms of appointment. Full and associate members are appointed for six-year, renewable terms.

Temporary membership. Temporary membership may be extended to well-qualified individuals who do not satisfy the above criteria, to perform specific functions for specific time periods, not to exceed one calendar year. They should be recommended by the departmental graduate faculty, department chairperson, and dean of the academic division. These nominations will then be acted upon by the chairperson of the Graduate Council, the dean of the Graduate School.

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21. DEGREE PROGRAMS
Table 21 shows the current degree programs offered at the University, a total of 150. See FIGURE 7. There is currently a graduate certificate program and a Ph.D. program in development. 

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22. GRADUATE STUDENT FINANCIAL SUPPORT
The Graduate School provides a variety of types and levels of support for graduate students. Departments are invited to nominate students for fellowships, scholarships, tuition awards, and travel and research grants. Federal programs specifically for graduate students are monitored and publicized to students to ensure that all possible financial assistance can be given.

In the academic year 2000-2001, a total of $19,668,590 was awarded to graduate students--an average of $6,780 for every graduate student enrolled on campus. This is an increase of 6% on last year’s average of $6,406. Perkins Loans and Work-Study Support. In the 2000-2001 academic year, no loans were made to students under this program. Under the work-study support program, 59 assignments were given to graduate students for a total value of $347,424. 

Travel and Research Awards. Twice each year the Dean of the Graduate School invites nominations for awards to support graduate research and travel. For research awards, priority is given to thesis, pre-dissertation, and dissertation research. For travel awards, priority is given to (a) graduate students who have been accepted to present personally their own research at the national meeting of their discipline’s major academic/professional organization, and (b) those whose department or college indicates its own support of the student by agreeing to cost share the necessary funding. In 2000/2001 160 students applied for support from these funds and 135received awards, a rate of 84%. A total of $25,085 was awarded to these successful students, representing an average of $185 per student. 

Graduate Council Fellowships. During the 2000-2001 academic year, the Graduate Council Committee on Financial Aid awarded 53 fellowships. Of this total, 11 were made for thesis/dissertation fellowships, 10 were research fellowships, and 32 were regular fellowships. The level of individual awards was increased in this academic year to the following new totals: Graduate Council Fellows - $12,500; first year Graduate Council Thesis/Dissertation Fellows - $13,000; and second year Graduate Council Thesis/Dissertation Fellows - $13,500. A further 20 research fellowships were awarded for the summer of 2001. In addition, several supplemental awards were made for $5,000 to a total of 10 recipients.

License Tag Fellows. Under the provisions of the National Alumni Association Collegiate License Tag Program, 80% of the proceeds received by the university is endowed, and the income generated is used to support graduate fellowships. In 2001 sufficient funds were available to provide 26 fellowships with a stipend of $10,000 each. At the end of the academic year, the
endowment had grown to over $6.7m. 

Graduate Fellowship Supplements. Each year additional amounts are awarded to graduate students from a special Presidential Graduate Fellowship Supplemental Fund. The fund is financed from logo and licensing fees received by the University’s Office of Auxiliary and Support Services. In 2000-2001 a total of $95,000 was awarded from this source. Alumni Association Graduate Scholarship Program. The National Alumni Association also funds a varying number of graduate fellowships in each college or school that offers a post-baccalaureate degree. 

Alumni Association Graduate Scholarship Program. The National Alumni Association also funds a varying number of graduate fellowships in each college or school that offers a post-baccalaureate degree.

Graduate and Faculty Scholarship Committee. As in previous years, the Committee contacted approximately 500 students to determine their eligibility for and interest in Rhodes, Marshall, Truman, and Fulbright fellowships. 14 students were formally interviewed resulting in 8 nominations, as follows: 

Scholarship

Number Interviewed Number Nominated
Rhodes               4              2
Marshall               1              1
Truman               5              1
Fulbright               4              4

As a result of these campus interviews in 2000, the following awards were made:

Brad Tuggle, a senior at the University, majoring in English, was awarded a Rhodes Scholarship, to begin in the fall of 2001.

Frances Hartwell, a senior at the University, majoring in international relations with a minor in Japanese, is the first UA student to receive a Fulbright Scholarship to Japan.

Monica Moss, a junior at UA, majoring in biology, with minors in geography and interdisciplinary environmental studies, was a finalist for the Truman Scholarship.

Minority Support. There are several programs aimed specifically at minority student groups and these are discussed in detail in a separate section of this Report.

Graduate Assistant Stipends. Departments are allocated a budget each year to appoint graduate teaching or research assistants and pay them stipends up to any level that they are able to fund. The Graduate School establishes minimum pay levels dependent upon the assigned work hours and gives guidance on the minimum and maximum number of enrolled hours that each student requires in order to maintain their full-time student status. For 2000-2001 the minimum stipend levels were:

Level Stipend
0.25 FTE   $4,213
0.50 FTE   $8,426
0.75 FTE   $12,639

For the new academic year 2001-2002 these stipend levels have been maintained unchanged. In addition, the Graduate School awards grants equal to the full tuition charge for 0.50 FTE or higher appointments, and prorated amounts for FTE appointments below 0.50 FTE. For fall semester 2001, the number of students who received graduate assistant appointments was 1,232, compared with 1,276 last year, however the total number of 0.50 full time equivalent assistants awarded actually increased by almost 8% from 997 to 1,076. There were 588 teaching assistants (last year 640) and 644 research, administrative, and other assistants (last year 636).

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23. MINORITY GRADUATE STUDENT FINANCIAL SUPPORT

The Graduate School continues to maximize the amount of financial support available for minority students. The following programs were utilized.

SREB Fellowships. The SREB Minority Doctoral Scholars Program encourages ethnic minority students to pursue doctoral degrees and become college professors.  The Graduate School holds the  #1 ranking for number of SREB doctoral scholars in fall 2001.  Since 1993, the Graduate School has enrolled 34 SREB Minority Doctoral Scholars and five have received their degrees.   SREB scholars receive $12,000 annual stipends plus tuition scholarships for up to 5 years of graduate study through a combination of SREB, Graduate School, and departmental funding.   In 2000-2001, the Graduate School and departments supported 20 SREB fellows in stipends and scholarships. Eight new UA doctoral students received SREB fellowships beginning in fall 2001, and the Graduate School and departments are supporting a total of 21 SREB scholars in fall 2001.

Future Faculty Fellows Program. This program is for African-American students who plan to become college or university professors.  Before 2001-2002, each Future Faculty Fellow received an annual stipend of $9,000, a departmental assistantship, and a full tuition scholarship for up to four years of full-time graduate study.  In the new academic year, the stipend has been increased to $11,000. A total of 23 doctoral students have received Future Faculty Fellowships since 1991; 11 have received their degrees.  In 2000-2001, the Graduate School supported three Future Faculty Fellows with stipends and scholarships.  The Graduate School is similarly supporting four Future Faculty Fellows in 2001-2002.

Joint Minority Faculty Development Program Fellowships. The Joint Faculty Development Program was implemented in Alabama HBCUs for practicing college teachers who do not have a terminal degree.  Faculty members participating in this program receive support from their home institution and a stipend and full tuition scholarship from The University of Alabama Graduate School.  Institutions participating in this program include Alabama State University, Alabama A & M University, and Oakwood College.  A total of 21 fellows have participated in the program since 1989, and nine have received degrees. In 2000-2001, three Joint Faculty Development Fellowships were awarded to faculty members of partner institutions.  Three HBCU faculty members are participating in the Joint Faculty Development Program in fall 2001.  Three additional fellows, having received Joint Faculty Development Fellowships for previous years, are being funded in 2001-2002 with departmental assistantships and other scholarships for the dissertation year.

UA/Stillman College Joint Faculty Staff Development Program. The major objectives of the program are to provide support for Stillman College faculty and staff to complete degree requirements for a graduate degree and to provide inservice and staff development.  In 2000-2001, the Graduate School provided tuition scholarships totaling $18,321 for nine faculty and staff members of Stillman College.

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24. GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIPS
Graduate assistantships were awarded to 1,232 students in the fall 2001 semester compared with 1,276 in the previous year. From the total for fall 2001, 268 are Teaching Assistants with primary teaching responsibility for a credit-bearing class; 320 are Teaching Assistants who do not issue final grades or who simply assist an instructor of record with their classes. The remaining 644 have various duties including research projects, administrative positions, and other non-teaching tasks.

Out of the total number of students receiving assistantships in fall 2001, 214 were funded from third party contracts, grants, gifts, or endowments. The remaining 1,018-over 82% of the total-were funded by the University. The colleges with the highest proportion of assistants funded from non-University sources are Engineering (34%) and Human Environmental Sciences (13%).

Total stipend payments made to graduate assistants during the academic year 2000-2001 amounted to $12,733,072. With a minimum stipend level of $8,426 for a 0.50 FTE student, this represents a total number of equivalent assistantships of 1,511 (last year 1,466). Of this total, $5,475,487 (43%) was paid to Teaching Assistants and $4,043,836 to Research and Other assistants funded by the University. The balance of $3,213,749 was funded by external sources. Again, the areas receiving the greatest support from external funding were the College of Engineering ($871,491 - 38%), Materials for Information Technology ($272,005 - 66%), and Human Environmental Sciences ($72,332 - 22%).

Average annual full time equivalent stipends awarded for the fall 2001 semester were $9,400 compared with $9,197 last fall. Again, the largest average awards were from externally funded assistantships with a total average of $10,467 ($9,718 last fall). The overall average award for Teaching Assistants with grading responsibility and who are funded by the University was $8,903 (fall 1999 $8,957) compared with $9,299 for TAs without grading responsibility (last fall $9,197).

The top 5 sponsors for research assistantships in 2000-2001 were the National Science Foundation ($424,366), the Department of Education ($355,296), Non-Alabama Colleges & Universities ($238,493), the Department of Health and Human Services ($213,969), and the private business sector ($210,729). For details, see FIGURE 8.

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25. WORKSHOP FOR NEW GRADUATE TEACHING ASSISTANTS
The fifteenth annual workshop for new Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs) was held at the Bryant Conference Center on August 16-17, 2001. The Workshop serves multiple purposes, including familiarizing new students with the campus and University policies, assisting in new GTAs' preparation to conduct classes, providing guidance about how to handle various classroom situations, and directing them to campus resources for ongoing improvement of teaching skills. During the Workshop, University faculty and staff members spoke on a wide range of areas related to teaching. Topics included syllabus and course preparation, conducting lab and discussion sessions, using multimedia and the Internet in college teaching, collaborative learning techniques as alternatives to the traditional lecture format, instructional support services for GTAs, effective communication in college teaching, and important policies and legal issues for GTAs and professors alike. Each new GTA received a copy of 2000-2002 Graduate Assistant Guide and numerous handouts on a variety of topics related to teaching.

Graduate Teaching Fellows, who are experienced GTAs recognized for superior teaching in their respective colleges, led eight simultaneous breakout sessions for a full day at the Workshop. The Fellows videotaped the new GTAs who each had prepared a short presentation. Each GTA received written and verbal analyses of teaching strengths and areas for improvement. The new GTAs also had the opportunity to analyze videos in order to "troubleshoot" some of the most frequently occurring problems in the classroom. The Fellows led the new GTAs in discussions of important issues such as services for students with disabilities, sexual harassment, academic misconduct, academic grievances, and the confidentiality of student records.

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26. AWARDS
On Honors Day 2001, the Dean of the Graduate School presented the following University-wide awards. Each student received a plaque and a check for $500.

Award Student Department
Excellence in Teaching by a Master’s Student Michael Shiffler Biological Sciences
Excellence in Teaching by a Doctoral Student Sondra Yarbrough Secondary Education
Excellence in Research by a Master’s Student Matthew Gage Anthropology
Excellence in Research by a Doctoral Student Trent Selby Chemistry
Outstanding Thesis Benjamin Murphy Mechanical Engineering
Outstanding Dissertation Dorina Miron Mass Communication

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27. ACADEMIC COMMON MARKET
The Academic Common Market is an interstate association of 16 Southern states that permits out-of-state students to enroll in selected programs at participating institutions while paying in-state tuition rates. This program is designed to both help the student by reducing his tuition cost and also the institutions from having to offer duplicate courses. The Graduate School is charged within the University with supervising both the graduate and undergraduate programs. Table 34 shows the current programs and participating institutions.

For the academic year 2000-2001 the data for ACM support were as shown in the table below. The total value of scholarships awarded under this program was $526,963 up 16.8% on last year's ($451,254).

 

  Fall 2000 Spring 2001 Summer 2001
Number of undergraduate students 83 77 25
Number of graduate students 18 18 10
Total students 101 95 35
       
Value of undergraduate scholarships awarded $210,412 $197,729 $30,081
Value of graduate scholarships awarded $39,637 $35,250 $13,854
Total value of scholarships awarded $250,049 $232,979 43,935
       
Most popular ACM majors HCM - 16 HCM - 15 HCM - 6
  MKT - 13 MKT - 15 MKT - 6
  AE - 9 AE - 9 MUS - 3

 

 

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